Dr. Charles T. Tart on June 26th, 2016

Bottom Line Spirituality: What Works, What Might Work Better Charles T. Tart I was reading along, without too much enthusiasm, a discussion held online by a group of informed people aiming to advance spiritual development a discussion about what various spiritual teachers, especially the historical Buddha, actually taught.  I say without too much enthusiasm, as […]

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Dr. Charles T. Tart on August 2nd, 2015

A few years ago, I and a few other Western scientists had an opportunity at informal meetings with a number of Tibetan lamas to talk about how Buddhism, particularly Tibetan Buddhism, might become more established and useful in modern, Western culture. I’ve just recently come across a preview of the brief talk I gave toward […]

Continue reading about Buddhism: Chances of Flourishing in the West?

Dr. Charles T. Tart on March 4th, 2015

            John Forrest Bamberger – Psychedelic Sunset 2 As mentioned in a variety of places, years ago I gave up meditation practice, having  decided that it apparently took a certain kind of talent that I didn’t have, so it was a waste of time for me to continue.  Then I […]

Continue reading about Meditation: Shifting The Focus Of Vipassana From Content To Process

Dr. Charles T. Tart on July 24th, 2014

Friends and I have been puzzling a lot lately over the descriptions of Buddhist enlightenment as being, among other things, devoid of intention.  Because one’s mind is not attempting are intending to make any aspect of experience opening a particular rules are expectations, a truer, more enlightened consciousness results.  Yet, the paradox, the meditative techniques […]

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Dr. Charles T. Tart on July 5th, 2014

Am I a Buddhist?  A ____ist?  And/Or?  Science and Spirituality Charles T. Tart As I mix the scientific and spiritual aspects of myself more in later life, I think it would be useful, and honoring today’s wise trend for full disclosure, to write a note on where I am coming from, as it’s complicated, and […]

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Dr. Charles T. Tart on June 29th, 2014

A response to something I had written to a correspondent helped me crystallize some thoughts about Buddhism and spiritual paths that I would like to share.  I will qualify this at first by reminding you, as I’ve done earlier in these postings (http://blog.paradigm-sys.com/740/) that I’m not a Buddhist scholar or an advanced meditator by any […]

Continue reading about Buddhism As a Spiritual Path – Questions and Answers

Readers of this blog and of my books tell me they like to hear about my personal psychological processes, how they affect my spiritual and scientific work, rather than only “Professor Tart’s” reasoned conclusions about such things.  It’s easy for me to write in the latter style, that’s what gets rewarded in science.  This apparent […]

Continue reading about Clarity, Confusion, Science, Tibetan Buddhism – Being a Scientist, Being a Spiritual Seeker – Tsoknyi Rinpoche’s New Book

Dr. Charles T. Tart on March 3rd, 2012

[In this and subsequent postings, I’ll be writing about Buddhism, but such writings of mine always need to be qualified.  I’m not a Buddhist scholar, for example, nor am I at all “enlightened” and thus speaking from deep interior knowledge.  Yet I am a sincere student of this particular path of spiritual development (as well […]

Continue reading about Thought is Bad? Enlightenment Means Not Thinking?

Dr. Charles T. Tart on November 25th, 2011

Once in a while I stop to think about what my spiritual practices are and where they might be going.  Not that my conceptions about it are anything final, but just as a guideline to myself, at the moment, and possibly of use to others.  So on the Rigpa Fellowship retreat last week, I was […]

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Dr. Charles T. Tart on November 23rd, 2011

At my San Diego Rigpa Fellowship retreat last week, lama Sogyal Rinpoche, in teaching about the nature of the unenlightened, ordinary mind (sem in Tibetan),  mentioned how perception can be distorted, especially by strong emotions like anger.  Naturally if you can’t perceive the world accurately, you’re going to do things that will have unintended and […]

Continue reading about Believing is Seeing – Who, Me?